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The Pharmacist Answers Podcast

Have a question for the pharmacist? Get your answers here! Clear explanations about complicated medical topics that anyone can understand. Disclaimer: The information contained in this blog and related podcast are not to be taken as medical advice, they are for informational and educational purposes only. If you resemble anything that is mentioned in this blog or related podcast, contact your doctor. The information contained in this blog and related podcasts is the opinion of the author and does not relfect the views of her employer, Walgreens. If you want to know what Walgreens thinks, ask Walgreens!
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Jun 5, 2017

Issues that cause your breathing to fail:
- Alleriges - congestion
- Viruses - congestion
- Deviated septum - the septum (the bone that separates the nasal cavity and divides your nostrils) can get crooked and change the size and access of the nostrils or nasal cavity.  Can be from trauma, or may gradually get crooked from chronic pressure
- Turbinate Hypertrophy - over-growth of tissue covering the turbinates (tissue-covered bones that add warmth and moisture to the air you breathe); can lead to snoring.  May be treated by steroid nasal sprays or surgery to remove extra tissue.
- Nasal Polyps - uneven overgrowth of mucus membranes (symptoms may be runny nose, post-nasal drip, stuffiness); not cancerous.  Treated by snipping them out.
- Sinus cancer - a single growing tumor that causes bulging - either around the eye, face, or mouth

Issues that cause your smelling to fail:
- Age
- Deviated septum
- Polyps
- Chronic sinus infections - the smelling sensors are inflamed or covered with mucus so much that they become damaged or less sensitive
- Smoking - smoke and toxins can damage smelling receptors in your nose; also the receptors become so clogged up with smoke and tobacco molecules that there's no room for other molecules to be detected.  This can be temporary or permanent.

Nosebleeds
- In kids, usually from trauma (either bumps and bonks or picking) or dry air (in the wintertime, use vaseline in the nostrils)
- In adults, can be from hypertension (high blood pressure) or chronic use of blood thinners

PSA: Treatment for a nosebleed:  DO NOT tip your head backwards!!!!!  It makes you swallow that blood!  THAT'S GROSS!!  Proper treatment:  pinch the nose and tip the head forward.  This allows a clot to form and clots stop the bleeding.  

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"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)  Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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