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The Pharmacist Answers Podcast

Have a question for the pharmacist? Get your answers here! Clear explanations about complicated medical topics that anyone can understand. Disclaimer: The information contained in this blog and related podcast are not to be taken as medical advice, they are for informational and educational purposes only. If you resemble anything that is mentioned in this blog or related podcast, contact your doctor. The information contained in this blog and related podcasts is the opinion of the author and does not relfect the views of her employer, Walgreens. If you want to know what Walgreens thinks, ask Walgreens!
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Now displaying: November, 2016
Nov 28, 2016

We talked to Emily Olson of Whole Life Wellness.

Takeaway point:  Talk to the people at the practice at which you are wanting to start receiving care.  If the doctor is not available for a direct interview, the office manager may be able to answer questions regarding the practitioners and their style of communicating with patients and their approach to care.

You can contact Emily at WholeLifeWellness.co (CO not COM) - it is under construction.
You can also reach her and find out information about the Whole Foods Nutrition Challenge on her Facebook page:  facebook.com/wholelifewellness3.  
***The next challenge starts January 9, 2017!***

***Time Sensitive****
She's offering some AWESOME specials--good until November 30th!
Here are the details (but be sure to watch the video for further explanations!):
*One-on-one 6-month coaching program: $584.00 (a 41% discount from $990.00--in honor of my 41st birthday!)
*The 'It's About Time! Wellness for Work' 60-Day course--a nitty-gritty and encouraging course focusing on being your best self for your best work and vocation (starting on Dec 5th): 194.00
*'Consistency 'Til Christmas'--a 25-day engaging group accountability experience--focusing on water, steps, veggies, and sleep--in order to stay healthy and focused during the holiday season (starting on Dec 1): $25
Contact her at: https://www.facebook.com/wholelifewellness3

Last but not least - The 7-Day Whole Food Challenge - sign up for FREE!!!

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"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)  Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Nov 22, 2016

Parietal Lobe - sits in the top of your head

Responsible for translating: touch, temperature, and pain
So does it tickle? Or hurt?  How does it hurt - throbbing, stabbing, sharp, dull?
The way your body translates temperature is based on the relative temperature to the body part that is being touched.

Proprioception - ability to know where you are in space relative to the other things around you

That awkward moment  when you think the toilet is higher or closer that it really is and you almost fall.

Hand-eye coordination - being able to see something that is moving and make your body to interact with it.

Two-point discrimination - the body's ability to tell if it's being touched by one thing or two separate things.  Different parts of your body have different levels of sensitivity.  Large body parts have a larger distance than small body parts (fingers and tongue have the closest discrimination distance due to the number of sensors).

Graphesthesia = writing feelings = being able to correctly translate letters or shapes drawn on your body without you looking.

When someone says "I can see it in my head" - it's the area that can recall visual memories.  Remembering the last place you saw your keys or visualizing driving directions based on the landmarks you pass (which is the only way we give directions in the South).  So, when someone closes their eyes to try and remember something, they're trying to deactivate their eyes and activate the parietal lobe.

Being able to identify a 3D object with your hands by touch only, and without your eyes.  This is also how Braille works.  Dot patterns created to represent letters.

Good info here and here about Braille activates the brain.

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"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)  Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Nov 15, 2016

Recap: Frontal Lobe
- Motor cortex - voluntary muscle movements, including the muscles that control speech
- Language translation
- Prefrontal cortex - personality, judgment

The main chemical, or neurotransmitter, that functions in this part of your brain is dopamine.

Dopamine is being studied in how it related to dementia and Alzheimer's.  It's affects are already known in Parkinson's disease.  Some newer studies are looking at dopamine's affect on addiction.  This is because dopamine is part of your brain's reward system.

So think about when you get a Facebook notification.... dopamine is released in your brain, and your brain really likes how dopamine makes it feel.  Feels good!  So you're brain will help you pay more attention to the things that will get you more dopamine (that's why a 5 second Facebook glance can turn into 30 minutes).  This also means that dopamine is involved in your attention span.  

Dopamine is also involved in short-term memory, especially in complex or cascading tasks (where you have to remember a thing from Step A to complete Step B) in your prefrontal cortex.

#RealTalk:  Cynthia doesn't have that many Facebook friends!

Diseases that take away short-term memory:  Dementia (general or Parkinson's-related), Alzheimers.

To form memories, your brain has to access the same information over and over again (like a smooth, speedy highway).  A road only traveled once, is not easy to travel again, especially if there's a long period of time between trips down that road.  So in diseases that involve brain cell death, there becomes less and less routes to take to the same memory.

Thus, the older memories are the last to go because they have the most access routes.

Dopamine is responsible for your planning and motivation mechanisms.

If I make a plan and carry out the plan, the reward of dopamine is the outcome.

The problem is that it requires increasing levels of "excitement" for your brain to receive the same level of dopamine as the very first time.  This is why people with devastating addictions end up on a downward spiral of ruin.

They've discovered a genetic component that affects the shape of the dopamine receptors.

scanned-image

These cells in your brain don't actually touch each other.  The terminals spit out dopamine, and it floats in the space and hopefully comes in contact with the next cell's dendrites.  The dendrites have dopamine-shaped keyholes that the dopamine should fit in the keyholes perfectly.  But they have discovered that a genetic component affects the keyhole shapes, and this make be a root cause for schizophrenia and attention deficits.

If you think about it, the classic symptoms of schizophrenia - paranoia, anxiety, hallucinations, split personalities - most things affected in your prefrontal cortex.  So if the dopamine receptors are "broken" in this area, you can see how there could be a dysfunction.  And this is produced at the genetic level.

Strokes or brain injury in this area of your brain can affect personality.

Back in the day.... there was a guy named Pheneas Gage who worked on the railroad.  An accident involving dynamite and a railroad spike, let to a major head injury and an altered personality!  Read more details here!

These parts of your brain don't grow back!

There is also a type of epilepsy (seizures).  Seizures are a misfire or a short in the electrical signals of the brain.  Seizures in the frontal lobe can possibly affect memory (epilepsy-related amnesia).  Must be diagnosed by a neurologist.

Some issues related to the speech motor area of the brain (Broca's area).  Stuttering (clinically diagnosed) is a misfire in the motor planning part of speech.  Aphasia (loss of words) - part of you brain knows the word but you can't seem to get it out of your mouth.  Strokes in this area can cause some strange affects in the loss of words.

We rub our forehead when we're trying to remember something because that's where our short-term memory is.

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"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)  Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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