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The Pharmacist Answers Podcast

Have a question for the pharmacist? Get your answers here! Clear explanations about complicated medical topics that anyone can understand. Disclaimer: The information contained in this blog and related podcast are not to be taken as medical advice, they are for informational and educational purposes only. If you resemble anything that is mentioned in this blog or related podcast, contact your doctor. The information contained in this blog and related podcasts is the opinion of the author and does not relfect the views of her employer, Walgreens. If you want to know what Walgreens thinks, ask Walgreens!
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Now displaying: November, 2015
Nov 23, 2015

3 areas that thrive when you get enough sleep

 

1. Productivity 

     - Better memory

     - Better attention span

     - Better creativity

 

The cells in your brain (neurons) run on electricity (aka the flow of positive and negative charges).  Sleep allows the electricity to reset, so it’s really to flow quickly and efficiently the next morning.

 

2. Health - when you sleep, you live longer.

     - Risk for cardiac disease increase with lack of sleep.

     - Inflammatory chemicals are cleansed out during sleep

     - Weight management - certain metabolism processes only happen while you’re sleeping

     - Tissues heal and rebuild

     - Reaction time improves - less likely to be in an accident

 

3. Emotions

     - Stress hormones are removed from your system

     - Gives your serotonin production a break, so you get a fresh supply in the morning (Serotonin is your happy chemical)

 

"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Nov 16, 2015

#BoPoTribe stands for Body Positivity, where we believe all bodies are beautiful bodies.  Founded by Susie @BeautyWithPlus

 

You can find the supportive community on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1090442574317174/, follow them on Twitter and Periscope, @bopotribe.

 

Three ways to love yourself

 

1.  Know how your body works and how to know when something goes wrong

2.  If you have a chronic disease, know the ins and outs of it

2b.Finding friends or a community to support you

3.  Do research about the decisions that you make, don’t just trust ads and fads

4*. Choose a healthcare team that is willing to listen to you and work with you instead of just working on you.

*Bonus!

Yes, and I brag on @RachelCMayo - again!  Because, well, she's AWESOME!

No matter what method you choose to enhance your health, my goal is for you to be empowered with knowledge and confidence to make a decision you’re happy with, and not be bullied into doing something you don’t want to do.

 

Just remember, we will not find you in a textbook!

 

"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Nov 9, 2015

Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): measures the percentage of your hemoglobin (the protein in your red blood cells that carry oxygen) has been coated in glucose. When there’s a lot of extra sugar floating around, it tends to stick to the other things floating around with it.  Red blood cells live for 120 days*, so that’s a lot of time to let sugar hitch a ride.  And while a blood glucose measurement gives a snapshot of what the blood sugar level is right now, the A1c measurements gives us an idea of what the blood sugar level has been during all the times you’re not pricking your finger to measure over the last 3 months*.

 

*I do realize that 120 days equals 4 months and not 3 months, but the really old and decrepit RBC’s that are close to their expiration are exactly that - decrepit, so they’re not in good enough shape to give us a trustworthy measurement.

 

For those with diabetes, the goal is to have an A1c >7%.  For the average non-diabetic, A1c is ~ 5% (though with the American lifestyle, that “normal” number is creeping up - but that has more to do with Type 2 Diabetes).

 

Rachel received lots of support through the people she met through the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and continues to support their cause and actively helps other T1D’s get connected.  She also participates in her local chapter of JDRF and participates in the Annual One Walk in Nashville (that’s where I got to hang out with Rachel for this interview!) You can find out what JDRF is all about by visiting JDRF.com and walk.JDRF.com.

 

++Time Sensitive ++ —> Follow Rachel on social media during the month of November to catch her Diabetes education Periscopes: @RachelCMayo

 

Music Credits:                                                                                                                 

"Radio Martini" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Pharmacist Answers Facebook Page

Nov 2, 2015

Without insulin, you would die!

 

Sugar scrub = sugar + water (+/- essential oils)

- a good exfoliant to remove dead skin

 

Fact:  Your tiniest capillaries are so small that red blood cells can barely squeeze through one at a time.  So, if the fluid around the red blood cell is full of sugar, it’s like that sugar scrub on your skin.

 

And that extra sugar can damage the capillaries in your eyes, finger tips, toes, and organs.

 

The cells in your body require glucose to do their jobs.  Insulin is the only key that will let the glucose in.  No key means no glucose.  No glucose means no energy.  And no energy eventually means death.

 

Insulin is also responsible for fat storage.

 

If you don’t eat the sugars, the body will use the fat stores on your body for energy.  But if you don’t consume energy sources (by being on a specific diet) AND your energy stores are depleted, your body will break down the proteins (aka muscles of your body) to make energy.  Your brain (and other organs in your body don’t want you to die).

 

Sugars and fats you eat gets turned into glucose.  Insulin lets opens the doors to allow the cells to use the glucose.  If there’s extra glucose around, insulin tells the liver to link it together to form glycogen and store it for later.  If the glycogen storage is full, insulin tells the liver to turn the glucose into triglycerides (think clogged arteries and growing fat deposits).

 

Free glucose is the easiest and fastest to use.  But during times that you’re not actively consuming sugars (like when you’re sleeping), your body is still working and that’s when glycogen can be used to provide glucose.

 

How much sugar in a day?  It’s always different for different people.  The goal is having a level blood sugar as much of the day as possible.  The rule of complex carbs being better than simple carbs is true, because it takes your body longer to break down and use complex carbs.  While simple carbs usually dump a whole log of glucose in your blood stream at one time.  And natural sugars are better than processed sugars because processed sugars tend to be more concentrated.

 

Your body has an easier time utilizing nutrients and supplements that look more like itself over ones that are synthesized in lab.

 

Rachel Mayo is my diabetes hero!

 

Find her at:

 

T1D vs T2D: http://pharmacistanswers.libsyn.com/type-1-diabetes-vs-type-2-diabetes

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